Blast from the Past Book Review: The Colonel ~ Mahmoud Dowlatabadi/ Der Colonel ~ Mahmud Doulatabadi

March 2020

So, it looks like I am going to have lots of time for reading in the near future. My doctor told me yesterday that I am going to have an operation soon to beat cancer in my breast. There will also further treatment but the operation will lead to which treatment would be the best.

Yesterday, I just let everything sink in. It is wonderful how the hospital is going about this diagnosis. Three times I have already met up with the breast care nurses who are able to explain any questions we have. I got a folder full of information not only about the medical situation but also any financial hardship and how to keep my well being up. All this helps a lot.

But it’s still a lot to take in and it is harder to be mindful and not to succumb to worry and fear. But I am determined not to let the drama take over my life. Been there done that. So I breathe, meditate, drink a cuppa and concentrate on keeping my life up as normal as I can. I work with music, mindfulness and at least 9 hugs a day from the best husband (Jeremy Clarkson voice) in the world ๐Ÿ™‚ .

Well, that is the update from my side but now over to a great novel I read in 2012 and I can only suggest to you to check it out.

This review was first posted in April 2012:

The Colonel

The Colonel by Mahmoud Dowlatabadi

15/03/12
Awwww am excited to read this book suggested for this month’s read at the International Fiction Reading Group in Norwich. When I read the back of the book it’s atmosphere reminded me of Isabelle Allende’s “House of Spirits” even though it is not magical realism. I’ll keep you updated what I think about it.

11/04/12
Today we will discuss it and I am glad I read it even though it was really hard work. Will go into more detail later on when I know if I am allowed to publish the review somewhere else as well because we were asked to write reviews by the publisher I think. But one I can say it is similar as well as nothing like the “House of Spirits”.

19/04/12
At last, I finished the review:

The colonel gets called in the middle of the night to attend to the funeral of his youngest tortured daughter. While going to the police station to get the body, preparing the funeral and getting home again he remembers the history of Iran from the Second World War up the revolution in 1979 as well as how his family is and was involved.

This seems to be the content of Mahmoud Dowlatabadi’s novel โ€œThe Colonelโ€ recommended by PEN, published by Haus Publishing in July 2011 and translated by Tom Patterdale. But when you start reading you get sucked into a nightmare of traumatised characters who try to make sense of decades of Iran’s governments which use violence and terror as means ruling.

This โ€œmaking senseโ€ is mirrored in the reading experience as the book works with changing point of views between the colonel, his oldest son Amir who has been tortured by the secret service of the shah regime and a third person narrator. The reader also has to make sense of characters turning up from the colonel’s and Iran’s past (his wife, The Colonel, a foreign ambassador….) and it is not clear if they are ghosts or โ€œjustโ€ in the colonels mind.
Both the colonel’s and his son’s memories are intertwined with what happens in the present and the reader is challenged not only to make sense of another culture but also of the storyline.

Many have mentioned how accurate Mahmoud Dowlatabadi describes Iran’s history from the Second World War up to the revolution in 1979 even though the author himself rather wants the novel to be judged by its literary importance. He wants it to be published in Iran but this historic accuracy seems to make it dangerous to the actual government and therefore it is still hold back by the Iranian authorities.

For me this book is a brilliant description of the psychological reactions of citizens living in a society which is ripped apart by revolution. It uses the literary means of different points of view as well as the mixture of past and present to show how your psyche gets confused when there is hidden trauma and violence that you are helplessly confronted with.

“The Colonel” has many levels (a historic level, a personal level…) that need exploring which makes it a challenging reading experience but it is worth facing it.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
15/03/12

Ahhhhh ich kanns gar nicht erwarten dieses Buch zu lesen, das fuer diesen Monat bei der International Fiction Reading Group in Norwich vorgeschlagen wurde. Als ich die Beschreibung auf dem Buchdeckel las, fand ich, dass es eine aehnliche Atmosphaere hat wie Isabelle Allende’s “Geisterhaus” obwohl es nicht zum Magischen Realismus gehoert. Ich werde Euch auf dem Laufenden halten, was ich darueber denke.

11/04/12
Heute werden wir das Buch diskutieren und ich bin froh, dass ich es gelesen habe obwohl es wirklich schwer war. Ich werde mehr dazu schreiben, wenn ich weiss, ob ich meine Besprechung auch woanders veroeffentlichen darf, da wir gefragt wurden, welche fuer den Verlag zu schreiben. Ich glaube es war der Verlag. Eines nur: Es war irgendwie wie “Das Geisterhaus” und irgendwie auch gar nicht.
19/04/12 (Diese Besprechung beruht auf der englischen Version, da ich die deutsche noch nicht gelesen habe)
Der colonel wird mitten in der Nacht aus dem Haus gerufen, um sich um das Begraebnis seiner gefolterten juengsten Tochter zu kuemmern. Waehrend er zur Polizeistation geht, den Leichnahm holt, das Begraebnis vorbereitet und wieder nach Hause geht, erinnert er sich an Iran’s Vergangenheit vom 2. Weltkrieg bis zur Revolution 1979 und wie seine Familie dabei involviert war.

Das scheint der Inhalt von Mahmud Doulatabadi’s Roman “Der Colonel” vom PEN empfohlen, beim Unionsverlag Zuerich herausgegeben und von Bahman Nirumand uebersetzt, zu sein. Doch wenn man das Buch zu lesen beginnt, wird man in einen Alptraum traumatisierter Charaktere hineingezogen, die versuchen, mit Jahrzehnten von gewaltaetiger Herrschaft von Iran’s Regierungen klar zu kommen.

Dieses “klarkommen” wird in der Leseerfahrung wieder gespiegelt, da die Erzaehlperspektive zwischen dem Colonel, seinem Sohn Amir, der von der Geheimpolizei des Shah Regimes gefoltert wurde, und einem Erzaehler wechselt. Der Leser muss sich auch mit Charakteren auseinandersetzen, die aus der Vergangenheit des Colonels und Iran’s auftauchen (seine Frau, der alte Colonel, einem auslaendischen Botschafter…)und es ist dabei nicht klar, ob sie Geister sind oder “nur” in der Fantasie des Colonels existieren. Die Erinnerungen des Colonels sind mit denen seines Sohnes und der Gegenwart des Romans verflochten, was den Leser herausfordert, nicht nur eine andere Kultur sondern auch die Handlung zu verstehen.

Viele haben darauf hingewiesen, wie genau Mahmud Doulatabadi die Geschichte Iran’s vom 2. Weltkrieg bis zur Revolution 1979 beschreibt aber der Autor selber moechte den Roman mehr von der literarischen Seite begutachtet haben. Er mochte den Roman im Iran veroeffentlichen und diese geschichtliche Genauigkeit scheint der dortigen Regierung gefaehrlich zu sein und so ist eine Veroeffentlichung im Iran noch nicht erlaubt.

Fuer mich zeigt dieses Buch eine grossartige Beschreibung der psychologischen Reaktionen von Buergern, die in einer Gesellschaft leben, die von Revolution zerstoert wurde. Es benutzt die literarischen Stilmittel unterschiedlicher Erzaehlperspektiven sowie das Wechseln von Vergangenheit und Gegenwart, um zu zeigen, wie die Psyche von Menschen verwirrt wird, wenn sie hilflos mit verstecktem Trauma und Gewalt konfrontiert wird.

Dieses Buch handelt auf vielen Ebenen (eine historische, eine persoenliche…), die es zu entdecken gilt, was das Buch eine herausforderne Leseerfahrung macht, die es aber wert ist.

View all my reviews